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(Good Gifts, continued from pg. 1)
Some workers have put more durable roofs on their homes, bought necessary furnishings, or purchased bicycles and other items to improve living conditions.

Most often the money was used to pay for secondary education. In Tanzania primary education is free, but only 5% of those who complete primary school are able to afford further education. This is because of the cost of boarding, which is often necessary because the schools (less numerous than primary schools) are often distant from student’s homes. Secondary schooling is often a key element in achieving success in adult life and can be equivalent in that society to a college education in ours.

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1

Chuwa Home Nursery 2,100 seedlings Map above shows nursery and tree planting locations for the ABCP Good Gifts Mpingo Planting Project, in the area of northern Tanzania south of Mt. Kilimanjaro and centered around the towns of Arusha to the west and Moshi to the east. The tree symbols mark the location of two tree nurseries and eight tree planting sites which are shown on this map, with two more distant locations off the map to the bottom left and bottom right. The legend at left shows location and numbers of trees, corresponding to the numbered tree symbols on the map. For a hi-resolution version of the map, click HERE.

2

Moshi Mpingo Plot

18,700 seedlings

3

Makuyuni

17,000 trees planted

4

Mandaka Kilema

200 trees planted

5

Kilindini

211 trees planted

6

Mkonga/Kawawa Rd

725 trees planted

7

Boma N'gombe

3,000 trees planted

8

Kikatiti Secondary School

3,000 trees planted

9

Maji ya Chai

1,700 trees planted

10

Olasita Arusha

243 trees planted

11

Mbulu

200 trees planted

12

Kisiwani Same

510 trees planted

In Tree Planting, Follow-Up Is a Primary Requisite for Success

Sebastian has been searching down planting sites which offer ideal climatic conditions, low competition from other species, and adequate soil fertility. His primary concern always is to choose sites where chances for long-term survival of the trees will be optimal.

There are many tree planting initiatives in which thousands of trees are planted and everyone feels good about it, but the trees often have minimal prospects for the future because they are planted in the wrong season or location, or do not have follow-up care. For mpingo, the leaves and young shoots of the tree are very attractive to wildlife and livestock, so it is often browsed too severely when young if not protected. Drought and fires also take their toll on young trees. Sebastian’s main objective is to leave trees for future generations. He is always emphasizing follow-up and replants if there have been problems in generating successful stands of trees.
(continued on pg. 3, see Follow-Up)

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ABCP Website maintained by James E. Harris, 2000.
Last revised 13 Oct 2009.